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Starr, Nathan

Name Street Town State From To
Starr, Nathan   Connecticut Valley Pennsylvania 1776 1845


Patent Date Remarks
     


Contract for
US Government, 1823 US Model 1817, 54 caliber flintlock rife
US Government, 1840 US Model 1817, 54 caliber flintlock


Product
In the late 1790s, Nathan Starr, Eli Whitney and Simeon North were asked by the govenrment to supply the army with guns. This was in forecast of war with france which was expected in mid 1797 (XYZ Affair).

December 10, 1798 - Receipt of $3500 advanced for manufacturing of 2000 cavalry swords with scabbards and belts at Middletown Connecticut. (Papers of the War Department 1784 - 1800)

December 10, 1798 - Hodgdon believes that Mr. Orr is qualified to go to Middleton to prove the swords made by Mr. Starr but, if he not acceptable, Mr. Annelly can also be recommended. (Papers of the War Department 1784 - 1800)

December 31, 1798 - Starr received $2000 from accountant of War Department by hands of Chauncey Whittlesey for manufacture and delivery of 2000 cavalry swords with scabbards and belts complete. (Papers of the War Department 1784 - 1800)

February 20, 1799 - Lewis received $9700 to be transmitted to Nathan Starr of Middletown Connecticut for manufacture and delivery of 2000 cavalry swords, with scabbards and belts. (Papers of the War Department 1784 - 1800)

.69 caliber, Nathan Starr improvement to Hall rifle, 29" round barrel, only patent model is known

.69 caliber flintlock, 1816 Springfield Flintlock Musket, 42" round barrel, made from 1829 to 1840

.54 caliber flintlock, 1817 US Modell Common Rifle Musket, 36" round barrel, made by Nathan Starr & Son of Middletown, CT., dated 1826, stamped at ther rear of the lock along with "MlDnCONN". Under the 1823 and 1840 contracts Starr made more than 10,000 Model 1817 Rifles.

The M1817 was the only primary issue weapon produced by contractors. None was made at a National Armory. The model was created at Harpers's Ferry Armory. Five contractors made the 38.200 weapons, Nathan Starr (about 10.000), Henry Deringer (about 13,000), Simeon North (about 7,000), Robert Johnson (about 5,000) and R & J.D. Johnson (about 3,000).

With its oval patchbox it remembers a little of a Pennsylvania Long Rifle. The gun is rifled with 7 grooves. Three barel bands attache the barrel to the stock.

Markings are, US on the lock and US/P/ at the breech of the barrel and US on the tang of the butt plate, Stock was walnut, the ramrod ia a sort of a trumpet with brass head. The rifle was not intended to be used with a bayonet.

Many of these M1817 were altered to percussion during hte 1840th and 1850th. During the Civil War so about 1,000 of these guns were converted by the Confederates to percussion the work was done by M.A. Baker, gunsmith in Fayetteville, North Carolina 1862 - 1863. Those guns were markes M.A. BAKER/FAYETTEVILLE N.C. on the lockplates and N. Carolina on the barrel.